A Sneak Peek at Our New Look

Our developers and software engineers have been hard at work to create a completely new look and feel at myBestHelper — clean, modern and elegant. We’re excited to make it even easier to see and share important information, send messages and find that great fit for your needs– whether you’re looking for help or offering it.

We’ve added a few new features too and can’t wait to introduce them to you!

Here’s a sneak peek at the new helper profiles. We’d love to hear your thoughts! You can leave a comment or send us a message at support@mybesthelper.com

myBestHelper new design

Like the new helper profiles? Let us know!

P.S. Thanks Denise for putting together an example profile for us!

- Team at myBestHelper

 

 

 

 

Kids and Planes in Vancouver – 5 Summer Activities for Aviators at Heart

Air show 2014

Boundary Airport Airshow – FREE family fun

Pilots are basically little kids, just instead of their stories staring with ‘One upon a time . . .’, they start with ‘There I was flying . . . ‘. For young aviators there are many great places to find story material. So here are a few of the high experiences that will create life ling memories for kids and grown ups who like planes: 

  1. Summer Fun for All – YVR Friday Fun Days: In the summer for eight weeks, Fridays at the Vancouver Airport welcome travelers and locals who love flying. Activities, games and live performances transform the airport and make it fun for kids. There are contests and interactive events – a different theme every Friday in July and August. 
  2. For those seeking the thrills and sounds of demonstration and aerobatic aircraft it is airshow season with the Boundary Bay Airshow on July 19th (free admission) and Abbotsford Airport Airshow on August 8, 9 and 10 (paid admission with a mix of military and civilian aircraft).
  3. At the Langley airport is the Canadian Museum of Flight with some classic aircraft including a WW I Sopwith Camel replica, Douglas DC3, CF-100 Cancuck jet fighter and CF-104 high speed interceptor. Many of the aircraft can be touched adding to the fun of visit.
  4. If you just want to do some kid friendly ‘plane spotting’, there is the Larry Berg Flight Path Park located to the east of YVR airport. Just park and watch everything from twin engine commuters to the ‘heavy metal’ large airliners take off and land. There is a huge climbable sculpture that is a 3D map of the earth showing destinations in reach of YVR. Continuing around on the south side of the airport you can go to the Flying Beaver Bar and Grill for great hamburgers (yum!) and a super view of watching float planes operating on the water next to the restaurant, or crossing the road near by as they are towed into hangars.
  5. “Future of Flight” – a tour of the Boeing plant in Everett, Washington is a unique experience worth the trip – just 1 hour south of Vancouver. Go see where half of the world’s airliners are born! In the main plant where your could play 300 simultaneous hockey games your mind become overawed by the sheer size. Explore the dynamics of flight and experience new aviation innovations. The tour is better geared for older kids and they must be at least over 4 feet due to safety issues, but don’t think of old, dirty, dangerous – the plant is pristine and immaculate.

Alexandra T. Greenhill, MOM CEO myBestHelper

Read them Fairy Tales!

mybesthelper:

Fairy tales have certainly found a new life in modern days between the successes of Shrek and Frozen, transforming but certainly not departing from how the power of imagination and magic can fire up children.

Originally posted on The Barefoot Gigi:

“If you want your children to be intelligent, read them fairy tales. If you want them to be more intelligent, read them more fairy tales.” – Albert Einstein

The Barefoot Book of Fairy Tales

Awake with Sleeping Beauty in the faraway land of fairy tales. The twelve classic stories in this exquisite book are teeming with magic, wonder, action and drama, as new life is breathed into some of the world’s favorite tales.

ForeWord Magazine‘s Book of the Year Silver Award Winner

Ages 5 to 11 years

Retold By: Malachy Doyle

Illustrated By: Nicoletta Ceccoli

Barefoot Book of Fairy Tales

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7 resources to help kids Learn to Code this summer

apple 2014 retail_learn_youth_camp

The case for why kids need to understand tech as an important 21st century skill has been made (see awesome code.org video on this here), but it’s not yet a core concept taught as part of the basic school curriculum.

So here are few options for parents interested in helping their kids develop tech skills this summer:

1. FREE – Virtual Google “Maker” camps – “Building, Tinkering and Exploring” 6 weeks starting July 7th 11 a.m. PST 

Google is offering six weeks of fun things to make and do for kids – all they need is a Google+ account and access to a PC, smartphone or tablet (if they are younger than 13, they will need to use the account of a parent).  The Maker Camps will have a weekly structure. In the morning, kids will complete a creative DIY project (for example a toy rocket) and in the afternoon they will also use Google Hangouts to talk to expert artists, makers and inventors as well as do virtual field trips to locations including Legoland in Denmark and Jim Henson’s Creature Workshop. See more here.

2. FREE – Sign up for a class at an Apple store – Various locations – local schedule 

At the Apple Store, you will find a variety of programs tailored just for kids, no purchase required. Youth Workshops, Field Trips, and Apple Camp are great ways to get kids thinking, learning, and creating — all while having fun. See more here.

3. $45: Learn to Code for Girls in Vancouver – Be like Ada – Sat, July 19th

Ada Lovelace, the beautiful black and white movie star and also a prolific tech inventor is the inspiration behind this one day bootcamp is for high-school girls only. They can learn to code and meet other girls just like them and hear from superhero women who have cool jobs because they code. To register, go to:www.belikeada.com

4. Code Kids Canada

See this CBC documentary for how and why kids are learning to code in the Maritimes. Inspirational videos galore you can show your kids to get them motivated. Motivation is then often enough to get them interested in using the many online and apps available to learn tech (see esp choice 1 above and 8 below).

5. Coder Dojo – Weekend Learn to Code for kids

CoderDojo is a global movement about providing free and open learning to youth, with an emphasis on computer programming. There are Coder Dojos in Toronto and Calgary, and one is being set up here in Vancouver.

6. Digital Media Academy – Summer Camps – $900+

This amazing opportunity to get top notch exposure to all aspects related to technology creation and use does not come cheap – but is now an option available across Canada. Week long summer camp classes for kids aged 8 to 12 and 13 and older covering a multitude of topics (film creating, game design, iPhone programming, robotics, app development etc) can cost around $900 each – sign up here for the few spots left. They have been doign in since 2002 and apparently, it is a life changing experience.

7. Apps and Games – Learn as You Play (ok for kids 8+)

 My Robot Friend allows kids to program the path of a funny robot and follow it’s adventures – hilarious and educational. Download here.

 The concept is simple — direct a robotic arm to move crates to a designated spot — but Cargo-Bot creates young programmers as it encourages the kind of innovative thinking necessary to learn programming skills. Download it here.

Hopscotch, is a simpler version of MIT’s scratch, and is AWESOME. It allows kids to quickly create games and animations by simple drag and drop of different commands. Kids can modify everything from size to speed to color – and see the results fast which is something that gets them hooked. Download it here.

Alexandra T. Greenhill, MD, mom, geek, CEO co-founder myBestHelper

10 Awesome Canadian Inventions – Happy Canada Day 2014!

Did you know all 10 of these are Canadian? Literally from coast to coast – from New Brunswick to Toronto, Manitoba, Alberta and BC – awesome Canadians have invented some things we literally can’t live without! mbh-Canada Day infographic

The 3 ways to stay safe and sound this #CanadaDay

1. Make sure you are ready for an emergency: A year ago, we wrote this post – and it’s incredible to see that so many of the families from Calgary are still displaced and homeless. So – as we get ready to celebrate, do spend a little of bit of time to plan out how your family would handle an emergency (hint: see our blog post for the four things you need to do, courtesy of ePact Network, emergency preparedness tool). 

2. Teach kids to respect the dangers of being near water: Too many accidents happen on the first long weekend of the summer. To have a safe and enjoyable holiday weekend, also review water safety with your kids – they forget things you assume they remember from last summer, so here are the 10 must know rules for kids near water.

3. Be wary of people who Drink & Drive:  Canada Day weekend has been historically in the top list for accidents, not only because more families are on the road but also because sadly too many people still get behind the wheel when they shouldn’t. So – be vigilant, make sure car seats are well installed and seat belts are properly applied.

Happy long weekend to all!

Alexandra T. Greenhill, MD, CEO cofounder myBestHelper